8 Rainy Day Activities for Kids

November 7, 2017

Mark Day School Rainy Day

Marin Mommies presents a sponsored article from Mark Day School in San Rafael, who gives us eight great ideas for keeping the kids busy—and busy learning—on a rainy day.

Mark Day School Rainy DayConstruct an obstacle course.

Give your kids an outlet for their energy. Build a giant obstacle course complete with a crepe paper laser maze in the hallway. Create hot lava boarders out of masking tape on the floor and leapfrog through couch cushions. (Tip: pool noodles and hula hoops make great obstacles, too!)

Camp in the Great Indoors & Build a Reading Fort.

Spark your child’s imagination by building a cozy fort. Turn off the lights and fire up the flashlights to make it a real indoor camping experience. There’s nothing like diving into a favorite story curled up a sleeping bag. If you want to take it to the next level, help them organize a book club to discuss their favorite characters.

Mark Day School Rainy DayToy take-apart.

Do your kids ever wonder how their favorite toys or electronics are made? Take them apart, piece by piece and see what’s inside! You never know what you might discover - it might even inspire your child to make his or her own toy.

Rainy day scavenger hunt.

Don your rubber boots and rain jacket and head outside to discover what emerges when the earth is damp. What crawling creatures creep to the surface? What happens to fallen leaves when they’re wet? Look for worms, frogs, snails, and ducks. Don’t forget to splash in a puddle or two!

Mark Day School Rainy DayCreate a cardboard world.

In a room full of cardboard and masking tape, anything is possible. Hunt through your recycling bin for shipping boxes and cardboard of all shapes and sizes. Challenge your kids to build a tower that touches the ceiling, a submarine complete with periscope, or see what creations they dream up on their own.

Build a chain reaction in your living room.

Create a life-sized domino effect from one end of the room to the other using household items. Instruct your kids to work as a team with friends or family members, and, for an extra challenge, try to communicate without words. Check out how this group built their chain reaction without speaking the same language.

Mark Day School Rainy DayMake a Marshmallow Catapult.

How far can you fling a marshmallow? Set up a friendly competition by making your own catapult using one marshmallow, eight craft sticks, four rubber bands, one binder clip, one paper clip, one spoon, two pipe cleaners, and masking tape. Click here for instructions, and check out these successful catapults in action.

Create a family recipe book.

Fill your kitchen with the sweet smell of freshly baked fare--and make learning taste good! Collect your favorite recipes in a book you can use to plan weekday meals. And, while you get elbow-deep in dough, take the opportunity to teach your child about science and math. Bonus: solve these nutrition-related math equations while your treat is in the oven.